[OE-core] How to trigger Yocto Linux /etc/profile or shell scripts in /etc/profile.d without shell logging in?


Federico Pellegrin
 


Hi Jupiter,
/etc/profile and similar are interactive shell (/bash) concepts, not really system startup ones. So indeed: just on a login (be it local, ssh and so on) they are executed.

If you want to execute something else without the need for logging it, you should look elsewhere, depending on your system manager: if systemd you should create a service and enable it, if sysvinit a init.d script.

HTH,
Federico


Il giorno lun 11 ott 2021 alle ore 06:30 JH <jupiter.hce@...> ha scritto:
Hi,

The Yocto uses /etc/profile for root login, but there is no root
physical login in an embedded device so the /etc/profile is never
called, I added a shell script to /etc/profile.d, it was not called
either. Both /etc/profile and scripts in /etc/profile.d can only be
invoked when I physically log into the debug console, that is
impractical. Appreciate your advice, how do you resolve that kind of
problem?

Thank you.

Kind regards,

- jupiter




JH
 

Hi Federico,

Thanks for your response.

/etc/profile and similar are interactive shell (/bash) concepts, not really
system startup ones. So indeed: just on a login (be it local, ssh and so
on) they are executed.
Understood, here is what I try to figure out. I use several systemd
services to start my tasks, each task is not just a system process, I
found it also has a system environment similar in user login from
/etcprofile, /home/user/.profile, my question is where is a system
environment file that each systemd service runs from?

I also thought that /etc/profile.d files should be automatically
invoked for each user login, but a systemd service does not run
/etc/profile.d files.

If you want to execute something else without the need for logging it, you
should look elsewhere, depending on your system manager: if systemd you
should create a service and enable it, if sysvinit a init.d script.
Understood, that was what I did originally, I have to run the setup
system environment in each service ExecStart script, that is why I am
looking for a global environment setup file to avoid duplication of
putting my environment scripts in each ExecStart execution file.

Thank you.

Kind regards,

- jupiter

HTH,
Federico


Il giorno lun 11 ott 2021 alle ore 06:30 JH <jupiter.hce@gmail.com> ha
scritto:

Hi,

The Yocto uses /etc/profile for root login, but there is no root
physical login in an embedded device so the /etc/profile is never
called, I added a shell script to /etc/profile.d, it was not called
either. Both /etc/profile and scripts in /etc/profile.d can only be
invoked when I physically log into the debug console, that is
impractical. Appreciate your advice, how do you resolve that kind of
problem?

Thank you.

Kind regards,

- jupiter




--
"A man can fail many times, but he isn't a failure until he begins to
blame somebody else."
-- John Burroughs


Federico Pellegrin
 


Hi Jupiter,
To centralize, agreed that you are using systemd, one way I could see is setting the variables in systemd-system.conf using the DefaultEnvironment directive, see: https://freedesktop.org/software/systemd/man/systemd-system.conf.html

This states:

----
DefaultEnvironment=ΒΆ

Configures environment variables passed to all executed processes. Takes a space-separated list of variable assignments. See environ(7) for details about environment variables.

Simple "%"-specifier expansion is supported, see below for a list of supported specifiers.

Example:

DefaultEnvironment="VAR1=word1 word2" VAR2=word3 "VAR3=word 5 6"

Sets three variables "VAR1", "VAR2", "VAR3".

----

This should have you variables management in each. Otherwise as you mention one can put in each script with either Environment to have them explicitly enumerated or with EnvironmentFile to read from a file, which may also fit your centralization hopes (but still require one line per startup script at least) and could be further sourced by non-systemd components as well if needed. (https://www.freedesktop.org/software/systemd/man/systemd.exec.html under Environment section)

HTH,
Federico


Il giorno lun 11 ott 2021 alle ore 11:05 Jupiter <jupiter.hce@...> ha scritto:
Hi Federico,

Thanks for your response.

> /etc/profile and similar are interactive shell (/bash) concepts, not really
> system startup ones. So indeed: just on a login (be it local, ssh and so
> on) they are executed.

Understood, here is what I try to figure out. I use several systemd
services to start my tasks, each task is not just a system process, I
found it also has a system environment similar in user login from
/etcprofile, /home/user/.profile, my question is where is a system
environment file that each systemd service runs from?

I also thought that /etc/profile.d files should be automatically
invoked for each user login, but a systemd service does not run
/etc/profile.d files.

> If you want to execute something else without the need for logging it, you
> should look elsewhere, depending on your system manager: if systemd you
> should create a service and enable it, if sysvinit a init.d script.

Understood, that was what I did originally, I have to run the setup
system environment in each service ExecStart script, that is why I am
looking for a global environment setup file to avoid duplication of
putting my environment scripts in each ExecStart execution file.

Thank you.

Kind regards,

- jupiter

> HTH,
> Federico
>
>
> Il giorno lun 11 ott 2021 alle ore 06:30 JH <jupiter.hce@...> ha
> scritto:
>
>> Hi,
>>
>> The Yocto uses /etc/profile for root login, but there is no root
>> physical login in an embedded device so the /etc/profile is never
>> called, I added a shell script to /etc/profile.d, it was not called
>> either. Both /etc/profile and scripts in /etc/profile.d can only be
>> invoked when I physically log into the debug console, that is
>> impractical. Appreciate your advice, how do you resolve that kind of
>> problem?
>>
>> Thank you.
>>
>> Kind regards,
>>
>> - jupiter
>>
>>
>>
>>
>


--
"A man can fail many times, but he isn't a failure until he begins to
blame somebody else."
-- John Burroughs